Upcoming at UUVerdugo

This Sunday, May 26

Sunday Service: Go the F to Church!
Minister: Rev KC Slack



In an increasingly disconnected and lonely world, Rev. KC makes a case for the importance and possibilities of spiritual and yes, even religious, community. Special guest vocalist Dr. Melanie Davis joins Rev. KC and accompanist Britta for the service.


10:30 a.m.

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Sunday, June 2

Sunday Service: Flower Ceremony
Minister: Rev. KC Slack

As June begins, we partake in a late-Spring UU tradition: the Flower Ceremony. Bring flowers to bless and share (we'll have some too!) as we celebrate the beauty and diversity of our earth and our human community. 


10:30 a.m.

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Saturday, June 15

The Verdugo HUUT! Presents: Once More Into the Breach!
Are we going to war again? Have we ever left? Our celebrated Hootenanny in the Hills draws performers and fans from the neighborhood and all over Los Angeles. This month's theme is Once More Into the Breach!—an evening of songs, readings, and related performance about war, which has proven fertile ground for all kinds of art (probably because of the blood). Whether you're for or agin' war, this month's HUUT will be filled as per usual with strong performances, good coffee, and fun surprises.

Sunday, June 23

Sunday Service: The Song of Isaac
Guest Speaker: Marty Barrett


The late, great Canadian troubadour Leonard Cohen penned one of the world's most evocative protest ballads, "The Song of Isaac," that set a high bar for a country's decision to go to war. A scholar and poet, Cohen drew the tune from the old Coventry Carol, which in turn was written about the Biblical Slaughter of the Innocents. We see how Cohen mixed "Old" Testament themes with some from the Gospels to write a Vietnam-era protest song that still resonates--if we let it--today.


10:30 a.m.

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Sunday, June 30

Sunday Service: Words for Joy
Guest Speaker: Mary Madill

We all know words can have an emotional impact.  Different languages have words (such as “verklempt”) for emotions that are not described specifically in English.  Let’s share words—English and more--that bring joy and love into our lives. 


10:30 a.m.

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Friday
Feb022018

President's Perspective: The True Protest Is Beauty

leonard cohen In an unlikely series of events, the true machinations of which are known only to that mysterious and terrifying organization, I have become president of the Board of Directors of my local Unitarian Church in the scenic, doughnut-rich, and fire-scarred Verdugo Hills of Southern California. As such I am called to write a monthly column for its newsletter. What better way to begin the year than with The Slaughter of the Innocents?

In such an ugly time, the true protest is Beauty On Christmas morning, 2017, I was driving to work and was lucky enough to hear a rebroadcast of an interview with the Canadian poet and troubadour Leonard Cohen. Cohen died in 2016 and the interview had been recorded a few months before he took off. He knew he was dying, was in great pain, yet gamely bestowed a lovely, poignant, and oftentimes hilarious valediction.

Leonard Cohen's Final Interview, September 2016

Among other things, he credited his approach to pain management to his decades-long association with an "alternative" Buddhism in a compound atop California's Mt. Baldy. Cohen said, "It makes whining the least appropriate response to suffering."

Pain and suffering are certainly things to complain about, but the only things we can truly control are our reactions to them. As we make our way into the second year of a presidential administration that at times seems both inevitable and the biggest joke ever played, I think of an exquisite protest song Cohen released in 1969—the year I was born—that puts the slaughter of innocents in a Biblical perspective.

"The Story of Isaac" takes the Old Testament tale of Isaac and his father, Abraham, and turns it into an anti-war message. Though he never mentions the Vietnam conflict raging at the time Cohen, speaking as Isaac, tells "you who build these altars now/To sacrifice these children/You must not do it anymore...A scheme is not a vision/And you never have been tempted/By a demon or a god." Isaac's father, on the other hand, was poised to kill his son for "The Beauty of the Word."

The Story of Isaac, Leonard Cohen

Cohen's simple arrangement of "The Story of Isaac" echoes the 14th century "Coventry Carol," a story of the Nativity that's about as far from "Jingle Bell Rock" as you can get. The "Coventry Carol," as we have come to know it, is a lullaby sung by the mothers of ancient Judaea to their children who are about to be put to death under the orders of King Herod. And how will Herod know of these children? By virtue of the census that is bringing Joseph and soon-to-be teen mom Mary to Bethlehem. The Carol is also known as "The Slaughter of the Innocents."

[caption id="attachment_1148" align="aligncenter" width="1024"]phil ochs "In such an ugly time, the true protest is beauty."—Phi; Ochs[/caption]

A Cohen contemporary, the late songwriter Phil Ochs, was fond of saying, "In such an ugly time, the true protest is Beauty." I'm not alone in thinking that the way we respond to ugly things can often be just as ugly. Social media helps this tendency, as they are data-mining, ad-supported force accelerators. We feel justified in leveling the playing field, scorching the earth, rather than "going high," as Michelle Obama said. We must not do that anymore.

I might not believe in "a demon or a god," but I like the high bar Isaac set for sacrificing the innocents among us, whether those be innocent of wealth, innocent of education, or even innocent of common sense. And I would like to make the righteous protests of my future beautiful ones.

Have a beautiful year.