Upcoming at UUVerdugo

This Saturday, June 15

The Verdugo HUUT! Presents: Once More Into the Breach!

Are we going to war again? Have we ever left? Our celebrated Hootenanny in the Hills draws performers and fans from the neighborhood and all over Los Angeles. This month's theme is Once More Into the Breach!—an evening of songs, readings, and related performance about war, which has proven fertile ground for all kinds of art (probably because of the blood). Whether you're for or agin' war, this month's HUUT will be filled as per usual with strong performances, good coffee, and fun surprises. Featuring Missy Lee, Andy McAllister, and Fogelfoot.
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Sunday, June 16

Sunday Service: Who's Your Daddy?
Guest Speaker: Marty Barrett


The role of the father is constantly evolving. What may have been true of our grandfathers might not be true now. In this congregation-led Father's Day service, we invite attendees to bring stories of our fathers, both traditional and not so much, and consider what unites them.


10:30 a.m.

Sunday, June 23

Sunday Service: The Song of Isaac
Guest Speaker: Marty Barrett


The late, great Canadian troubadour Leonard Cohen penned one of the world's most evocative protest ballads, "The Song of Isaac," that set a high bar for a country's decision to go to war. A scholar and poet, Cohen drew the tune from the old Coventry Carol, which in turn was written about the Biblical Slaughter of the Innocents. We see how Cohen mixed "Old" Testament themes with some from the Gospels to write a Vietnam-era protest song that still resonates--if we let it--today.


10:30 a.m.

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Sunday, June 30

Sunday Service: Words for Joy
Guest Speaker: Mary Madill

We all know words can have an emotional impact.  Different languages have words (such as “verklempt”) for emotions that are not described specifically in English.  Let’s share words—English and more--that bring joy and love into our lives. 


10:30 a.m.

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« May 2018 | Main | President's Perspective: The True Protest Is Beauty »
Thursday
Mar012018

April 2018

Dear Friends,

 

"We are afraid to care too much, for fear that the other person does not care at all."

This quote from Eleanor Roosevelt was, when I first read it, a decades-old splash of cold water. On its face it says so much about the things that thwart our natural tendencies toward doing good — that our efforts won't be appreciated. 

But it also countenances so many daily inequalities in our lives which may or may not have different contemporary names, from donor fatigue to atychiphobia (Fear of Failure: Why try at all if my goals are unreachable?) to co-dependence.

In the world of personal news platforms and social commentary, we might put too much spin on our caring because we are prepared either for apathy or for a negative, knee-jerk reaction. The backlash against the impressive and fierce Parkland students comes to mind as an example of our culture's destructive antipathy toward simply showing we care, even if our opinions are different. 

In our UU community setting, that quote has a bearing on our occasional rifts that arise among a group of spirited, educated people, each of whom enjoys the simple pleasure of knowing they're right.

We are losing our minister in a few months, and my predecessor in this position also resigned. Two good, able, educated, spirited people. My goal in this gig, the goal of the Board, and the goal of you, the congregation of UUVerdugo is to recommit ourselves to Right Relations with each other, to throw open our doors, to draw seekers to us, and to seek people out. It is very simply the means of our survival. 

Today, ask yourself: Are these differences of opinion insurmountable? Is there a bridge I can build? What is my fear of not being agreed with?

Like that guy Eleanor was married to said, "We have nothing to fear but fear itself." And we certainly should not be fearful of caring too much. I personally will not point and laugh at you if I see you caring too much. 

Marty Barrett, Board President

 

 

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