Upcoming at UUVerdugo

This Sunday, May 26

Sunday Service: Go the F to Church!
Minister: Rev KC Slack



In an increasingly disconnected and lonely world, Rev. KC makes a case for the importance and possibilities of spiritual and yes, even religious, community. Special guest vocalist Dr. Melanie Davis joins Rev. KC and accompanist Britta for the service.


10:30 a.m.

***

Sunday, June 2

Sunday Service: Flower Ceremony
Minister: Rev. KC Slack

As June begins, we partake in a late-Spring UU tradition: the Flower Ceremony. Bring flowers to bless and share (we'll have some too!) as we celebrate the beauty and diversity of our earth and our human community. 


10:30 a.m.

***

Saturday, June 15

The Verdugo HUUT! Presents: Once More Into the Breach!
Are we going to war again? Have we ever left? Our celebrated Hootenanny in the Hills draws performers and fans from the neighborhood and all over Los Angeles. This month's theme is Once More Into the Breach!—an evening of songs, readings, and related performance about war, which has proven fertile ground for all kinds of art (probably because of the blood). Whether you're for or agin' war, this month's HUUT will be filled as per usual with strong performances, good coffee, and fun surprises.

Sunday, June 23

Sunday Service: The Song of Isaac
Guest Speaker: Marty Barrett


The late, great Canadian troubadour Leonard Cohen penned one of the world's most evocative protest ballads, "The Song of Isaac," that set a high bar for a country's decision to go to war. A scholar and poet, Cohen drew the tune from the old Coventry Carol, which in turn was written about the Biblical Slaughter of the Innocents. We see how Cohen mixed "Old" Testament themes with some from the Gospels to write a Vietnam-era protest song that still resonates--if we let it--today.


10:30 a.m.

***

Sunday, June 30

Sunday Service: Words for Joy
Guest Speaker: Mary Madill

We all know words can have an emotional impact.  Different languages have words (such as “verklempt”) for emotions that are not described specifically in English.  Let’s share words—English and more--that bring joy and love into our lives. 


10:30 a.m.

***
« Believing What I Wanna Believe, But Leaving Room for Everything Else | Main | »
Thursday
Apr262018

May 2018

Dear Friends,

 

The evangelicals who helped to elect Donald Trump often employ the expression "God uses imperfect tools" to justify their decision. While in this case that excuse seems a desperate rationalization (and is very funny when paired with the idea of a "tool"), the concept is intriguing, isn't it? It suggests, like "any port in a storm" or "the cracks are what let the light in" that we can get at the truth from a number of unexpected angles.

 

In 1884 the British educator Edwin Abbott Abbott (I know what you're saying: If he was so educated, why did he have a redundant Abbott?) wrote the book "Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions." While it was written as an allegory of Victorian England, its applications have multiplied since its publication.

 

The book describes a 2-dimensional world, Flatland, and the adventures of narrator A Square. In Flatland, the appearance of a 3-dimensional object causes consternation and panic. The residents simply cannot conceive of a being (in this case, The Sphere) with another dimension. In fact, the residents at first interpret The Sphere as a circle. Similarly, when A Square descends to the 1-dimensional Lineland, he has trouble convincing its monarch of his own existence. Then, when A Square suggests to his pal The Sphere that there might be a fourth or even fifth dimension, well, you'd think that The Sphere would be more open-minded, but he scoffs at the idea. Later, A Square encounters the sole inhabitant of Pointland, who is such a narcissist that he believes all ideas spring from himself.

 

As an allegory of Victorian England, "Flatland" is wickedly funny. As an allegory of who we often are today, unaccepting of the possibility of something outside our own dimension (or safe space, or box, or comfort zone), even when presented with evidence and even when that evidence is put in action, it's damning.

 

I don't know what to do with that Tool in the White House but, in our ministerial search and the things we have to think of going forward, let's not dismiss truth when we hear it, no matter the imperfections of its source. I hope we can add a dimension or two to this congregation.

 

Yours,

 

Marty Barrett, Board President

 

 

 

Reader Comments

There are no comments for this journal entry. To create a new comment, use the form below.
Editor Permission Required
You must have editing permission for this entry in order to post comments.