Upcoming at UUVerdugo

This Saturday, December 15

UUVerdugo Movie Night!

"It's A Wonderful Life" (1946)


Bring the family for the greatest Christmas movie that isn't "Love Actually." Watch 1940s Encino stand in for the fictitious Bedford Falls, New York, as our hero, George Bailey (Jimmy Stewart) learns that "no man is a failure who has friends." Will we be giving out wings? No, but we will be giving out pizza.

An informal poll around the sanctuary reveals that, though many have seen part of this wonderful movie, not everyone has seen all of it. Friends, it's worth it. See Drew Barrymore's grand-uncle! See what happened to Alfalfa! Meet the original Ernie & Bert! Swallow the moon!

Trigger warning: This film looks askance at librarians and garlic eaters.

5 p.m.

***

Sunday, December 16

Weekly Service: Sol Invictus or: The Dark Days Are Over

Guest Speaker: Marty Barrett


The celebration of Sol Invictus (The Unconquered Sun) began before Christ and lingers as a wintertime event commemorating the strengthening Sun after a period of increased darkness.

Join us as we discuss the ancient pedigree of Sol Invictus and the ageless appeal of rebirth in such a cold time.

Note: We have incorporated the Sol Invictus theme for this Friday's Verdugo HUUT, too! Why not come to both?

10:30 a.m.

***

Friday, December 21

The Verdugo HUUT! Presents: Sol Invictus

Join us for our monthly Hootenanny in the Hills, our final HUUT of the year. We've been lucky to have hosted so many of L.A.'s best musicians, comedians, and storytellers this year, and the Sol Invictus show will feature the jubilant Madame Headdress, Fogelfoot, and players to be named later.

Why fight your way into Hollywood for your holiday entertainment when L.A.'s best entertainers come here? Especially since the failing L.A. Times just called us hilarious and compelling?

That settles it. You'll come here.

We provide low-cost, licensed childcare for kids over two. Contact Elizabeth Brown by December 14 if you're interested.

7 p.m.

***

Sunday, December 23

Weekly Service: What Mary Said

Rev. KC Slack

Known by many names—The Blessed Virgin; Mary, Mother of God; Qānitah; Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe; sayyidatuna; The Queen of Heaven—Mary, a young Jewish girl from Nazareth, became an important figure not only in Catholicism, but in Protestant Christianities, Islam, and in many individuals' spiritual practices.

What does the story of Mary—her life and her own words in so far as we know them—have to tell us today? 

10:30 a.m.

***

Monday, December 24

Candlelight Christmas Eve

Rev. KC Slack


Join us for a candlelight service of music and storytelling as we celebrate Christmas Eve together.

7 p.m.

***

Sunday, December 30

Weekly Service: Visions for the Future

Lay Leaders: Ann Kleinsasser and Madeline Dow


At the close of the year, we gather downstairs in the round for connection, sharing, warmth and community.

This is a good time to take stock of our congregational life and reaffirm why we are here. What is our vision and purpose as a congregation? What hopes and dreams do you have for our community as we move forward into a new year.  How can we support these hopes and dreams? Come and share your thoughts.

10:30 a.m.

***

 

"You're a Uni-What?", 8 minute video

A fun introduction to what Unitarian Universalism is all about.

These Principles and Sources of faith

are the backbone of our Unitarian Universalist community. (In no particular order)

We affirm and promote seven principles

  1. The inherent worth and dignity of every person;
  2. Justice, equity and compassion in human relations;
  3. Acceptance of one another and encouragement to spiritual growth in our congregations;
  4. A free and responsible search for truth and meaning;
  5. The right of conscience and the use of the democratic process within our congregations and in society at large;
  6. The goal of world community with peace, liberty, and justice for all;
  7. Respect for the interdependent web of all existence of which we are a part.

We draw from six sources

  1. Direct experience of that transcending mystery and wonder, affirmed in all cultures, which moves us to a renewal of the spirit and an openness to the forces which create and uphold life;
  2. Words and deeds of prophetic women and men which challenge us to confront powers and structures of evil with justice, compassion, and the transforming power of love;
  3. Wisdom from the world's religions which inspires us in our ethical and spiritual life;
  4. Jewish and Christian teachings which call us to respond to God's love by loving our neighbors as ourselves;
  5. Humanist teachings which counsel us to heed the guidance of reason and the results of science, and warn us against idolatries of the mind and spirit;
  6. Spiritual teachings of earth-centered traditions which celebrate the sacred circle of life and instruct us to live in harmony with the rhythms of nature.