Upcoming at UUVerdugo

This Saturday, June 15

The Verdugo HUUT! Presents: Once More Into the Breach!

Are we going to war again? Have we ever left? Our celebrated Hootenanny in the Hills draws performers and fans from the neighborhood and all over Los Angeles. This month's theme is Once More Into the Breach!—an evening of songs, readings, and related performance about war, which has proven fertile ground for all kinds of art (probably because of the blood). Whether you're for or agin' war, this month's HUUT will be filled as per usual with strong performances, good coffee, and fun surprises. Featuring Missy Lee, Andy McAllister, and Fogelfoot.
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Sunday, June 16

Sunday Service: Who's Your Daddy?
Guest Speaker: Marty Barrett


The role of the father is constantly evolving. What may have been true of our grandfathers might not be true now. In this congregation-led Father's Day service, we invite attendees to bring stories of our fathers, both traditional and not so much, and consider what unites them.


10:30 a.m.

Sunday, June 23

Sunday Service: The Song of Isaac
Guest Speaker: Marty Barrett


The late, great Canadian troubadour Leonard Cohen penned one of the world's most evocative protest ballads, "The Song of Isaac," that set a high bar for a country's decision to go to war. A scholar and poet, Cohen drew the tune from the old Coventry Carol, which in turn was written about the Biblical Slaughter of the Innocents. We see how Cohen mixed "Old" Testament themes with some from the Gospels to write a Vietnam-era protest song that still resonates--if we let it--today.


10:30 a.m.

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Sunday, June 30

Sunday Service: Words for Joy
Guest Speaker: Mary Madill

We all know words can have an emotional impact.  Different languages have words (such as “verklempt”) for emotions that are not described specifically in English.  Let’s share words—English and more--that bring joy and love into our lives. 


10:30 a.m.

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Tuesday
Apr012014

Social Justice Ministry

Members of the Social Action Circle address our Unitarian Universalist principles by researching and proposing humanitarian projects in which the congregation may become involved. Those principles include the promotion of justice, equity and compassion in human relations; and respect for the interdependent web of all existence.

Some Ongoing Projects:

Collecting and donating food, clothing and personal care items to the Burbank Temporary Aid Center (BTAC), a vital “aid station” for those in need.

Contributing financially to the Unitarian Universalist Service Committee, a voluntary, nonsectarian organization working to advance justice throughout the world.

Participating in the "Alliance for the Care of Abused Children" program of the Los Angeles County Department of Children and Family Services, where we provide individualized holiday and birthday gifts for specific children who may have little or no family contacts.

Sponsoring the “Feel Like a Princess” event through the San Fernando Valley Chapter of the Los Angeles Department of Children and Family Services, which helps young women with few financial resources prepare for their proms.

Supporting and volunteering in children’s education, including School On Wheels and Reading to Kids.

Educating the congregation on legislative actions/ballot measures that specifically relate to UU principles; writing letters to add to our congregation’s voice about issues that affect us.  

Unitarian Universalists are dedicated to living our faith and practicing what we preach.

Working for civil rights and combating oppression are essential parts of our spiritual journey. Our faith community has worked for justice for hundreds of years, from advocating for free speech and the free practice of religion as far back as the fifteen hundreds to helping to abolish slavery and supporting women’s rights beginning in the eighteen hundreds.

We continue to work for justice today in ways that resonate with our Principles, from protecting our environment to standing up for the full rights of bisexual, gay, lesbian, and transgender people. While we cannot always take action on every issue that arises, we do our best to make our congregations, our communities, our denomination, and our world a better place.

Our Unitarian Universalist commitment to social justice fuels our advocacy for comprehensive sexuality education; economic justice; environmental justice; equality for bisexual, gay, lesbian, and transgender (BGLT) people and their families; gender equality; immigrant rights; and other important causes which Unitarian Universalists and UUA congregations support.